Wednesday, 16 April 2008

THE on University Rankings - should rankings be trusted?

This blog has covered University rankings extensively as it is important to pick your University very carefully given the increasing costs of higher education.

University ranking ARE growing in influence. Is this a good thing? On one level it is important for overseas students especially to receive as much information as possible. Moreover, if employers use these rankings to rank applicants then is is increasingly important that students at least play the game whatever the merits or otherwise of haing a ranking of Universities.

Universities also need to understand the importance of rankings and are quickly learning how to play the game:

The report makes it clear why institutions take their results so seriously. Research by one research-intensive institution featured in the study found that 50 to 60 per cent of its intake had been influenced by league tables.


With percentages like that you can expect more creative accounting at the University level.

This excellent article breaks down each ranking to show which indicators are used and the relative weightings.

A measured relationship [THE]

League tables are used to gauge university performance, influence potential students and steer management policy, but should they be trusted? A survey suggests that many fall short of the mark, writes Rebecca Attwood

A nother day, another university league table hits the newspaper headlines. Perhaps you are sceptical about their worth - but nonetheless, a sudden drop in your institution's ranking can be demoralising and can feel like an unfair reflection of the institution and your work.

According to a major study into their impact published this week, university league tables have "serious methodological limitations" and yet are growing in influence.

A study commissioned by the Higher Education Funding Council for England found that institutions shared many concerns about the validity of league tables but were nevertheless strongly influenced by rankings when it came to setting institutional strategy.

Researchers from the Centre for Higher Education Research and Information at The Open University and Hobsons Research dissected five major national and international rankings - The Sunday Times University Guide, The Times Good University Guide, The Guardian University Guide, Shanghai Jiao Tong University's Academic Ranking of World Universities and the Times Higher Education/QS World University Rankings.

[All are covered and linked to it this blog]

Their findings highlight a lack of transparency about the way the league tables are compiled. Some measures, the researchers conclude, are "poor proxies" for the qualities that the tables are attempting to evaluate - many are determined by the data available rather than by clear concepts of excellence, and the methods for calculating scores can be questionable.

In many cases, compilers changed methodologies frequently. "It could be argued that league tables count what can be measured rather than measure what counts," and rankings reflect reputation more than quality or performance, the authors assert.

17 comments:

William Allan Kritsonis, PhD said...

Dr. William Allan Kritsonis Inducted into the William H. Parker Leadership Academy Hall of Honor (HBCU)

Remarks by Angela Stevens McNeil
July 26th 2008

Good Morning. My name is Angela Stevens McNeil and I have the privilege of introducing the next Hall of Honor Inductee, Dr. William Allan Kritsonis. Dr. Kritsonis was chosen because of his dedication to the educational advancement of Prairie View A&M University students. He earned a Bachelor’s degree in 1969 from Central Washington University in Ellensburg, Washington. In 1971, he earned his Master’s in Education from Seattle Pacific University. In 1976, he earned his PhD from the University of Iowa.
Dr. Kritsonis has served and blessed the field of education as a teacher, principal, superintendent of schools, director of student teaching and field experiences, invited guest professor, author, consultant, editor-in-chief, and publisher. He has also earned tenure as a professor at the highest academic rank at two major universities.
In 2005, Dr. Kritsonis was an Invited Visiting Lecturer at the Oxford Round Table at Oriel College in the University of Oxford, Oxford, England. His lecture was entitled the Ways of Knowing through the Realms of Meaning.
In 2004, Dr. William Allan Kritsonis was recognized as the Central Washington University Alumni Association Distinguished Alumnus for the College of Education and Professional Studies.
Dr. William Kritsonis is a well respected author of more than 500 articles in professional journals and several books. In 1983, Dr. Kritsonis founded the NATIONAL FORUM JOURNALS. These publications represent a group of highly respected scholarly academic periodicals. In 2004, he established the DOCTORAL FORUM – National Journal for Publishing and Mentoring Doctoral Student Research. The DOCTORAL FORUM is the only refereed journal in America committed to publishing doctoral students while they are enrolled in course work in their doctoral programs. Over 300 articles have been published by doctorate and master’s degree students and most are indexed in ERIC.
Currently, Dr. Kritsonis is a Professor in the PhD Program in Educational Leadership here at Prairie View A&M University.
Dr. William Kritsonis has dedicated himself to the advancement of educational leadership and to the education of students at all levels. It is my honor to bring him to the stage at this time as a William H. Parker Leadership Academy Hall of Honor Inductee.

William Allan Kritsonis, PhD said...

Houston Chronicle

August 5, 20088

Dr. William Allan Kritsonis

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Doctoral & Faculty Publications for 2007-2008
Prairie View A&M University

In 2007 and 2008 faculty in the PhD Program in Educational Leadership at Prairie View A&M University mentored doctoral students to publish over 120 national refereed, peer-reviewed articles in professional journals; faculty members published over 90 articles.
During the same years, a doctoral faculty member had a book published by members of the Oxford Round Table in the University of Oxford, Oxford, England. Another faculty member was invited to write a history and philosophy of education for the ABC-CLIO Encyclopedia of World History. Another faculty member published two articles in the Encyclopedia of Educational Leadership and Administration published by SAGE Publications, Thousand Oaks, California.
In summary, in 2007 and 2008, doctoral students and faculty in the PhD Program in Educational Leadership at PV have published over 200 national refereed articles in professional periodicals. Over 70 of these of these articles are indexed in the national data base system ERIC (Education Resources Information Center).
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

William Allan Kritsonis, PhD said...

Attorney General Greg Abbott – A Model of Success and Determination

Attorney General Greg Abbott was the commencement speaker on Saturday, May 10th at Prairie View A&M University. As most people know, Greg Abbott is in a wheelchair. All of us attending the graduating ceremony were captivated by his remarks, professionalism, and physical effort. This was the largest graduating class, over 800, in the history of PVAMU, which was founded in 1868.
Greg Abbott greeted each of our graduates with a radiating smile, personal handshake, and called each graduate by their first name. I know this as a fact because I sat in the front row, as one of my students received her doctorate at the ceremony. It was inspiring to see Attorney General Abbott’s physical effort. He moved his wheelchair forward with three arm motions to shake the hand of each graduate, and then moved backwards with the same motions to allow the graduate to retreat from the platform. If my calculations are somewhat accurate, Mr. Abbott made approximately 4,800 movements in his wheelchair, along with personally congratulating each of the 800 graduates by their first names.
Attorney General Abbott displayed outstanding listening skills by recalling each graduate’s name and exhibited tremendous physical endurance. His commencement address will be remembered by all of us in attendance for the rest of our lives.

William Allan Kritsonis, PhD
Professor
PhD Program in Educational Leadership
Prairie View A&M University

Hall of Honor
William H. Parker Leadership Academy
Prairie View A&M University
The Whitlowe R. Green College of Education

Distinguished Alumnus
Central Washington University
College of Education and Professional Studies
Ellensburg, Washington

William Allan Kritsonis, PhD said...

Houston Chronicle – Press Release

August 1, 2008

Dr. William Allan Kritsonis Helps Doctoral Students and Faculty Members Publish


In 2007 and 2008, Dr. William Allan Kritsonis, a professor teaching in the PhD Program in Educational Leadership at PVAMU/Member of the Texas A&M University System mentored doctoral students to publish over 125 national refereed, peer-reviewed articles in professional journals; he helped faculty members publish over 98 articles.
During this time, Dr. Kritsonis had a book published by members of the Oxford Round Table in the University of Oxford, Oxford, England. He was also invited to write a history and philosophy of education for the ABC-CIO Encyclopedia of World History.
Dr. Kritsonis published two articles in the Encyclopedia of Educational Leadership and Administration published by SAGE Publications, Thousand Oaks, California.
In summary, Dr. Kritsonis helped doctoral and faculty members in the PhD Program in Educational Leadership at PV publish over 200 national refereed articles in professional periodicals. Over 80 of these articles are indexed in the national data base system ERIC (Education Resources Information Center).
In 2008, Dr. Kritsonis was inducted into the William H. Parker Leadership Academy Hall of Honor, Graduate School, Prairie View A&M University – The Texas A&M University System. He was nominated by doctoral and master’s degree students.

William Allan Kritsonis, PhD said...

FOCUS on Colleges, Universities, and Schools
VOLUME 3 NUMBER 1, 2009

Functions of the Doctoral Dissertation Advisor

William Allan Kritsonis, PhD
Professor
PhD Program in Educational Leadership
The Whitlowe R. Green College of Education
The Texas A&M University System
Prairie View, Texas
Hall of Honor (2008)
William H. Parker Leadership Academy
PVAMU/The Texas A&M University System
Invited Visiting Lecturer
Oxford Round Table
Oriel College in the University of Oxford
Oxford, England
Distinguished Alumnus
Central Washington University
College of Education and Professional Studies
Ellensburg, Washington


ABSTRACT

The purpose of this article is to provide suggestions for doctoral dissertation advisors. The content was developed from discussions with colleagues, doctoral candidates, recipients of advanced degrees, and reviewing literature pertaining to doctoral studies. This article provides some general guidelines and practical functions for doctoral dissertation advisors.


Introduction

Those who succeed in academic scholastic writing at the advanced levels typically write an excellent doctoral dissertation. In writing a dissertation, there appears to be an enjoyment of the constant flowing of ideas. At the doctoral level, mentors are critically important in helping their students complete the dissertation, and later in getting graduates published at the national level in refereed, juried, peer-reviewed scholarly journals.




Purpose of the Article

The purpose of this article is to establish some basic functions of the doctoral dissertation advisor. Hopefully, the suggestions will help others in the doctoral advisement process.


Basic Functions of the Doctoral Dissertation Advisor

The following suggestions are functions of a doctoral dissertation advisor:

1. Keep a folder for each doctoral student. This will give you the opportunity to review previous and current work completed by the student. It will give you the opportunity to review your own comments. Reviewing the folder periodically enables you to firmly grasp the student’s concerns with conducting research.

2. Keep track of emails that you send and other correspondence. Make certain that you communicate to students frequently. Not communicating with doctoral students is condescending and shows disrespect.

3. Establish a personal, but professional relationship with your doctoral student advisees. Being a mentor is a very serious responsibility. See each of your students first as people. They have goals and aspirations just as you do.

4. Develop your own style in dissertation advising. The best way to develop your own style is simply by doing it.

5. Be positive in working with doctoral students on their dissertation. Make certain to provide feedback that is constructive and useful. Always strive to be positive and enthusiastic in working with doctoral students on their dissertations. Be cheerful, optimistic, and helpful. Direct advisees to relevant sources of information.

6. Know your strengths, attributes, weaknesses, and limitations.

7. Do you homework in working with each advisee. Make certain to study the dissertation topic your advisee is interested in developing.

8. Think about your own dissertation experience. Avoid any mistakes that were made. Incorporate effective strategies that work.

9. Encourage advisees to document what they want to do as a dissertation topic.

10. Strive to make a difference as an advisor to your advisee. Model appropriate behavior.
11. Make your presence matter in the life of the doctoral student.

12. Accept the responsibility of doing a good job.

13. Accept the fact you know more about writing a dissertation than your advisee.

14. As an advisor, recognize the time when the dissertation topic must be revised or changed. Do not be afraid to tell an advisee when they are wasting time on something that will not work or is not relevant.

15. Be ready to suggest to your advisee the need to shift the research time to other areas of the dissertation if you see the advisee bog down.

16. Do not hesitate to tell the advisee to put more effort into the dissertation.

17. Make certain to realize as an advisor there are many different strategies for writing a doctoral dissertation.

18. Encourage doctoral students to talk with others who are writing their dissertation. They often can provide practical feedback and encouragement.

19. Encourage doctoral students to communicate with others in different colleges or departments who are writing their dissertation.

20. Encourage advisees to explore ideas beyond your suggestions.

21. Tell your advisees how you like to work with them. If you need to work from an outline – tell the advisee. Let advisees know your own work habits.

22. Remember, it is the advisee’s dissertation – not yours. They must do the work.

23. If you are an inexperienced dissertation advisor, try to work with a colleague who has successful experience. As an advisor, you are there to help. Help as much as you possibly can.

24. Be supportive of the advisee’s work. Use specific examples in telling advisees their work is good or not acceptable. Point out where the work needs improvement.

25. Make certain you develop the habit of getting things back to students in a timely manner; hopefully, within five - ten business days. Through being diligent in your efforts, the advisee will keep focused. Read dissertation chapters at your earliest convenience. Do not let too much time elapse. Remember, you are a busy person and so is your advisee. Establish timelines with the advisee and meet them.

26. Give your doctoral students the responsibility of meeting deadlines.

27. Encourage students to contact you if you have taken too long to respond to them.

28. As an advisor, give lots of suggestions. Be specific, exact, concise, detailed, and comprehensive in all aspects of your advising.

29. Encourage your doctoral students to talk with their committee members throughout the entire process. Other committee members might suggest different approaches or a new study altogether. When this happens, meet with the advisee. Perhaps you will agree or disagree. Keep the dialogue open and positive.

30. It is your duty to encourage your advisees to do the work that must be done to have a quality and professionally satisfying dissertation.

31. Be available. If this means meeting with a doctoral student at a location other than the university, do it. Some advisees need a lot of attention, guidance, and direction. Others are self-directive. Be flexible and adaptable.

32. The advisee should not hear major changes for the first time at the proposal defense.

33. In giving guidance to your advisees, constantly prepare them for their proposal defense and ultimately defending their dissertation. This will keep them focused.

34. Do not take on the job of advisor if you do not intend to make it a priority. Dissertation advisement takes an enormous amount of time and commitment. During the entire process, it will be necessary for you to meet with the other members of the dissertation committee to discuss the progress of the doctoral student.

35. You want your students to tell you “I like the way you are always available, keep up the good work.”

36. The doctoral student and advisor should consult someone other than the student’s committee members for special advising or expertise.

37. Help your advisee when there is a need to clarify the dissertation topic.

38. Try to obtain adequate funding for your advisee’s research.

39. Link students with similar dissertation topics together.

40. During the advisement process, dissertation advisors should mentor students by helping them to prepare manuscripts for publication in national, refereed, peer reviewed journals.

41. Consider or recommend doctoral students for university responsibilities, such as facilitating classes when professors are unavailable, and giving examinations at distance learning facilities. This gives them experiences in higher education.

42. Involve doctoral students with coordinating orientation sessions for new students.

43. As a dissertation advisor, develop an approval form for both the proposal and dissertation defense that must be signed by all committee members prior to scheduling a formal meeting. By doing so, the committee members agree the student is ready to present and defend.


Concluding Remarks

In conclusion, the purpose of this article was to establish some general functions of a dissertation advisor. There are numerous functions of a dissertation advisor and these are only a few. In addition, my intention was to provide some general guidelines for thoughtful consideration. Perhaps, you can add to the list.


References

Dave, R. (2007 December). Quality time with your dissertation. Retrieved December 4,
2007, from the Association for Support of Graduate Students Website: http://www.asgs.org/
Eastwood, J.S. (2000). Comprehensive editing. Retrieved December 2, 2007, from
www.jeastwood.com
Jensen, S. (2000). Dissertation news. Retrieved December 3, 2007, from
http://www.dissertationdoctor.com
________________________________________________________________________
Formatted by Dr. Mary Alice Kritsonis, National Research and Manuscript Preparation Editor, National FORUM Journals, Houston, Texas www.nationalforum.com

William Allan Kritsonis, PhD said...

Writing for Professional Publication in National Refereed Journals A Session for Faculty and Doctoral Students

University of Southern California, Los Angeles
College of Education

June 26th 2008

William Allan Kritsonis, PhD
Professor
PhD Program in Educational Leadership
Prairie View A&M University/The Texas A&M University System

1. Professional reasons for writing for publication
2. Personal reasons for writing for publication
3. How real writers behave
4. Writer’s write for the following reasons
5. How to get started
6. What will “sell” the editor on your work?
7. Formula: Brilliant Ideas + Good Luck + Knowing the Right People = Publication
8. On scholarly work
9. Reasons to write and publish journal articles
10. Writing and publishing journal articles enables you to…
11. Three basic types of articles: practical – review or theoretical – research
12. Quantitative Studies
13. Qualitative Research
14. On writing books
15. Four phases of book publishing (Fun – Drudgery – Torture – Waiting)
16. Some reasons to write a book
17. Where does the dollar go after a book is published?
18. What do editors and reviewers really want?
19. Earning approval from editors and reviewers
20. What to remember about bad writing
21. How to get fired as a reviewer
22. Publish or perish or teach or impeach
23. I’ve been rejected many times – should I give up?
24. In writing, how you read is important
25. How teachable is writing?
26. “I can’t seem to tell how my writing is going while I am doing it. Can you help?
27. Remember your purpose in writing
28. What differentiates ordinary writing from writing with style
29. It must get somewhat easier to write, otherwise, how would some authors become so prolific?
30. If writing for publication does not prove to be lucrative, why bother?
31. Why creative work is worthwhile
32. Show respect for your writing. It is about what the readers should know. If this puts a strain on a professional relationship, then so be it.
33. “Why I Write” (Orwell) Sheer egoism, aesthetic enthusiasm, historical impulse, and political purpose.
34. What really makes an academic write?
35. The Writer’s Essential Tools – words and the power to face unpleasant facts.
36. No human activity can sap the strength from body and life from spirit as much as writing in which one doesn’t believe.
37. “Because it was there.” Edmund Hillary. And with this comment he supplied generations with a ready-made and unanswerable defense for any new undertaking even writing.
38. Why we write.
39. Climbing Your Own Mountain
40. Be yourself. Have fun writing.

Please list any other topics you want Dr. Kritsonis to discuss.
281-550-5700 Home; Cell: 832-483-7889 – williamkritsonis@yahoo.com

William Allan Kritsonis, PhD said...

William Allan Kritsonis – Mentored Research – Doctoral Students – Master’s Student’s – College Faculty - 2008


Butler, N.L., Kritsonis, W.A., Griffith, K.G., Tanner, T. & DeMoulin, D.F. (2008) Are Polish Engineering Learners Studying German so That They Can Secure Employment in Germany? A Brief Commentary. The Lamar University Electronic Journal of Student Research, 8 (Summer).

Butler, N.L., Pirog, R., Kritsonis, W.A., Griffith, K.G. & DeMoulin, D.F. (2008) Are Polish Post Secondary Vocational School Learners Studying English so That They Can Secure Employment in the UK and Ireland? A Brief Commentary. The Lamar University Electronic Journal of Student Research, 8 (Summer)

Butler, N.L., Kritsonis, W.A., Griffith, K.G., Tanner, T. & DeMoulin, D.F. (2008) Are Some Topics Uncomfortable for Polish Higher School Students to Discuss During English Classes?
A Brief Report. The Lamar University Electronic Journal of Student Research, 8 (Summer)

Eisenman, R., Kritsonis, W.A. & Tanner, T. (2008) Assignment of Black and White College Students to Remedial Education Classes. The Lamar University Electronic Journal of Student Research, 8 (Summer)

Greiner-Wronowa, E., Pusoska, A., Butler, N.L., Tanner, T., Kritsonis, W.A., Griffith, K.G. & DeMoulin, D.F. (2008) Complementary Measurements to Diagnostic Glass Surface Corrosion by Raman Spectroscopy: Ground Breaking Research. The Lamar University Electronic Journal of Student Research, 8 (Summer)

Butler, N.L., Kritsonis, W.A., Griffith, K.G., Tanner, T. & DeMoulin, D.F. (2008) Do Poles Want Religion to be a Part of the School Leaving Exam (the Matura)? A Brief Note. The Lamar University Electronic Journal of Student Research, 8 (Summer)

Butler, N.L., Kritsonis, W.A., Griffith, K.G., Tanner, T. & DeMoulin, D.F. (2008) Do Polish Engineering Learners Prefer to Learn How to Speak German From a Native Speaker Than From a Non-Native Instructor? Snapshot Comment. The Lamar University Electronic Journal of Student Research, 8 (Summer)

Butler, N.L., Kritsonis, W.A., Griffith, K.G., Tanner, T. & DeMoulin, D.F. (2008) Do Polish Engineering Students Prefer Speaking in Person, Listening, Reading or Writing During German Classes? A Brief Note. The Lamar University Electronic Journal of Student Research, 8 (Summer)

Butler, N.L., Davidson, B.S., Pirog, R., Kritsonis, W.A. & DeMoulin, D.F. (2008) Do Polish Post-Secondary Vocational School Students Prefer Speaking in Person, Listening, Reading or Writing during English Classes? The Lamar University Electronic Journal of Student Research, 8 (Summer)

Butler, N.L., Mroz, L., Pirog, R., Kritsonis, W.A., Griffith, K.G. & DeMoulin, D.F. (2008) Do Polish Post-Secondary vocational Institution Learners Prefer to Learn How to Speak English From a Native Speaker than from a Non-Native Instructor? Snapshot Comment. The Lamar University Electronic Journal of Student Research, 8 (Summer)

Butler, N.L., Pirog, R., Kritsonis, W.A., Griffith, K.G. & DeMoulin, D.F. (2008) Do Polish Secondary School Learners Want Marks in Religion to Be Included in Year End Averages? A Brief Commentary. The Lamar University Electronic Journal of Student Research, 8 (Summer)

Eisenman, R., Kritsonis, W.A., Tanner, T. & DeMoulin, D.F. (2008) On Improving Student Grades and Graduation: A Snapshot of Minority and White Students’ Success from Supplemental Instruction at the University of Missouri at Kansas City. The Lamar University Electronic Journal of Student Research, 8 (Summer)

Kritsonis, W.A. (2008) The Adolescent’s Perception of Failure (2008) The Lamar University Electronic Journal of Student Research, 8 (Summer)

William Allan Kritsonis, PhD said...

Recognized as Distinguished Alumnus

In 2004, Dr. Kritsonis was recognized as the Central Washington University Alumni Association Distinguished Alumnus for the College of Education and Professional Studies. Final selection was made by the Alumni Association Board of Directors. Recipients are CWU graduates of 20 years or more and are recognized for achievement in their professional field and have a positive contribution to society. For the second consecutive year, U.S. News and World Report placed Central Washington University among the top elite public institutions in the west. CWU was 12th on the list in the 2006 On-Line Education of “America’s Best Colleges.”

William Allan Kritsonis, PhD said...

William Allan Kritsonis, PhD
Editor-in-Chief
NATIONAL FORUM JOURNALS
Founded 1983
Over 5,000 Professors Published
www.nationalforum.com

NATIONAL FORUM JOURNALS
Partial Listing of Affiliated Universities, Colleges, and Schools

A.E. Phillips Laboratory School, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA
Albuquerque Public Schools, Albuquerque, NM
Alabama A&M University, Normal, AL
Anchorage School District, Anchorage, AK
American Association of University Professors, Washington, DC
Appalachian State University, Boone, NC
Atlanta Public Schools, Atlanta, GA
Azusa Pacific University, Azusa, CA
Ball State University, Muncie, IN
Baltimore County Public Schools, Baltimore, MD
Barry University, Miami Shores, FL
Ben Gurion University-Negev, Birmingham, AL
Biblioteksjanst Subscriptions, Lund, Sweden
Birmingham City Schools, Birmingham, AL
Blackwell’s Information Services, Oxford, England
Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA
Boston School District, Boston, MA
Boston SPA, Wetherby, Great Britain
Bowie State University, Bowie, MD
Bradley University, Peoria, IL
Brandon University, Brandon, Manitoba, Canada
Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
Brooks Administrative Center, Prince Frederic, MD
Broward Community College, Fort Lauderdale, FL
Buffalo City School District, Buffalo, NY
Buffalo State College, Buffalo, NY
Caddo Parish School Board, Shreveport, LA
California State University, Dominguez Hills, CA
California State University, Fresno, CA
California State University, Fullerton, CA
California State University, Los Angeles, CA
California State University, San Marcos
Canisius College, Buffalo, NY
Carson Newman College, Jefferson, City, TN
Central Missouri State University, Warrensburg, MO
Central Washington University, Ellensburg, Washington
Chestnut Hill College, Philadelphia, PA
Chicago Public Schools, Chicago, IL
City University, Bellevue, WA
Clark County School District, Las Vegas, NV
Clemson University, Clemson, SC
College of Modern Languages, Kaohsiung, Taiwan
Columbia University, New York, NY
Columbus City School District, Columbus, OH
Dallas Independent School District, Dallas, TX
Dawson U.K., LTD, Kent, England
Dayton Public Schools, Dayton, OH
Denver Publish Schools, Denver, CO
Detroit Public Schools, Detroit, MI
District of Columbia Public Schools, Washington, DC
Devine Information Services, Westwood, MA
Drake University, Des Moines, IA
East Baton Rouge Parish School Board, Baton Rouge, LA
East Carolina University, Greenville, NC
Eastern Washington University, Cheney, WA
EBSCO Industries, Birmingham, AL
Emporia State University, Emporia, KS
ERIC Clearinghouses
FAXON, Westwood, MA
Fayetteville State University, Fayetteville, NC
Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL
Florida Gulf Coast University, Fort Myers, FL
Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL
Forth Worth Independent School District, Fort Worth, TX
Fresno Unified School District, Fresno, CA
Furman University, Greenville, SC
George Washington University, Washington DC
Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA
Goodlett Elementary School, Memphis, TN
Gulf Coast State University, Ft. Myers, FL
Harrassowitz, Wiesbaden, Germany
Harvard University, Cambridge, MA
Hawaii Department of Education, Honolulu, HI
Henderson State University, Arkadelphia, AR
Houston Independent School District, Houston, TX
Illinois State University, Normal, IL
Iowa State University, Ames, IA
International Resource & Development Center, Richmond, VA
John Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD
Karger AG, Schweiz, Switzerland
Kean University, Union, NJ
Long Beach Unified School District, Long Beach, CA
Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge
Los Angeles County Office of Education, Los Angeles, CA
Los Angeles Unified School District, Los Angeles, CA
Loyola University, Chicago, IL
Loyola University, New Orleans, LA
Marshall University, South Charles, WV
Miami-Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL
Memphis City School District, Memphis, TN
Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI
Midwest Library Services, Bridgeton, MO
Milwaukee Public Schools, Milwaukee, WI
Minneapolis Public Schools, Minneapolis, MN
Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS
Mobile County Public School System, Mobile, AL
Morris MacDonald School, Manitoba, Canada
New Orleans Public Schools, New Orleans, LA
New York City Department of Education, New York, NY
Niagara University, Niagara Falls, New York
Nicholls State University, Thibodaux, LA
North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC
North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND
North Mississippi Regional Center, Oxford, MS
Ohio University, Athens, OH
Oklahoma City Public Schools, Oklahoma City, OK
Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
Oakland Unified School District, Oakland, CA
Omaha Public Schools, Pittsburgh, PA
Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR
Oriel College, University of Oxford, Oxford, England
Portland State University, Portland, OR
Portland School District, Portland, OR
Postfach, Schweiz, Switzerland
Prairie View A&M University, Prairie View, TX
Providence College, Providence, RI
Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
Readmore Academic Services, Inc., Turnersville, NJ
Rhode Island College, Providence, RI
Richmond City School District, Richmond, VA
Roosevelt University, Chicago, IL
Rowan University, Glassboro, NJ
San Antonio Independent School District, San Antonio, TX
San Diego State University, San Diego, CA
San Diego City Unified School District, San Diego, CA
San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA
San Francisco United School District, San Francisco, CA
Seattle Pacific University, Seattle, WA
Seattle Public Schools, Seattle, WA
Seattle University, Seattle, WA
SKANFO
South Carolina State College, Orangeburg, SC
Southeastern Louisiana University, Hammond, LA
Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL
Southern University, Baton Rouge, LA
Southwest Missouri State University, Springfield, MO
Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA
Sul Ross State University/Rio Grande College, Del Rio, TX
Sul Ross State University/Rio Grande College, Eagle Pass, TX
Sul Ross State University/Rio Grande College, Uvalde, TX
SUNY, New York, NY
Sweets Blackwell, Inc., The Netherlands
Sweets Blackwell, Inc., Runnemeda, NJ
Sweets Blackwell, Inc., Exton, PA
Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York
Tennessee State University, Nashville, TN
Texas A&M University, College Station, TX
The Truman Pierce Institute, Auburn University, Auburn, AL
The University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada
Toledo-Lucas County Public Library, Toledo, OH
Troy University, Troy, AL
Tufts University, Boston, MA
Tucson Unified School District, Tucson, AZ
University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL
University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR
University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH
University of Colorado at Denver, Denver, CO
University of Dayton, Dayton, OH
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
University of Georgia, Athens, GA
University of Idaho, Moscow, ID
University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI
University of Houston, Houston, TX
University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA
University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan
University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, LA
University of Louisiana at Monroe, Monroe, LA
University of Louisville, Louisville, KY
University of Lowell, Lowell, MA
University of Maine, Orono, ME
University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA
University of Memphis, Memphis, TN
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN
University of Mississippi, Oxford, MS
University of Missouri, Columbia, MO
University of Missouri at St. Louis, St. Louis, MO
University of Montana, Missoula, MT
University of Nebraska at Lincoln
University of Nebraska at Omaha
University of Nevada at Las Vegas, Nevada
University of Nevada at Reno, NV
University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC
University of North Carolina at Wilmington, Wilmington, NC
University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND
University of North Florida, Jacksonville, FL
University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO
University of Notre Dame, South Bend, IN
University of Oregon, Eugene, OR
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
University of San Diego, San Diego, CA
University of San Francisco, San Francisco, CA
University of Scranton, Scranton, PA
University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL
University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC
University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD
University of Southern Maine, Gorham, ME
University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS
University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN
University of Texas, Arlington, TX
University of Texas, Austin, TX
University of Texas of the Permian Basin, Odessa, TX
University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
University of the Virgin Islands, St. Thomas, VI
University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA
University of Washington, Seattle, WA
University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY
Valdosta State University, Valdosta, GA
Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
Washington State University, Pullman, WA
Wayne State University, Detroit, MI
Weber State University, Ogden, UT
Western Illinois University, Macomb, IL
West Texas A&M University, Canyon, TX
West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV
Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, NC
Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY
Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA
Wichita School District, Wichita, KS
Winona State University, Winona, MN
Winston-Salem State University, Winston-Salem, NC
Xavier University, New Orleans, LA
York University, Ontario, Canada
Youngstown State University, Youngstown, OH

William Allan Kritsonis, PhD said...

About Dr. William Allan Kritsonis
Remarks by Jennifer Butcher
August 22nd 2008

I have the privilege of introducing Dr. William Allan Kritsonis. Dr. Kritsonis earned a Bachelor’s degree from Central Washington University in Ellensburg, Washington. He earned his Master’s in Education from Seattle Pacific University and his PhD from the University of Iowa. He also was a Visiting Scholar at both Columbia University in New York, and Stanford University, Palo Alto, California.
Dr. Kritsonis has served education as a teacher, principal, and superintendent of schools. He has earned tenure as a professor at the highest academic rank at two major universities. He was also a professor at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge.
In 2004, Dr. Kritsonis was recognized as the Central Washington University Alumni Association Distinguished Alumnus for the College of Education and Professional Studies.
In 2005, Dr. Kritsonis was an Invited Visiting Lecturer at the Oxford Round Table in the University of Oxford, Oxford, England.
Dr. Kritsonis is a well respected author of more than 500 articles in professional journals and several books. In 1983, Dr. Kritsonis founded the NATIONAL FORUM JOURNALS. These publications represent a group of highly respected academic journals in education.
Currently, Dr. Kritsonis is a Professor in the PhD Program in Educational Leadership here at Prairie View A&M University. At PV he has helped graduate students publish over 400 articles in professional journals and most are indexed in ERIC.
Dr. Kritsonis has dedicated himself to the advancement of educational leadership and to the education of students at all levels.
On July 26th this summer, Dr. Kritsonis was inducted into the William H. Parker Hall of Honor. He was nominated by doctoral and master’s degree students at Prairie View. It is my pleasure to welcome Dr. William Allan Kritsonis.

Anonymous said...

The Lamar University Electronic Journal of Student Research
Spring 2009

Teacher Talk:
Speaking Success to Reluctant ELA Students


Lavada Moore Walden William Allan Kritsonis, PhD
PhD Student in Educational Leadership Professor and Faculty Mentor
The Whitlowe R. Green College of Education PhD Program in Educational Leadership
Prairie View A&M University The Whitlowe R. Green College of Education
Prairie View, Texas Prairie View A&M University
English Language Arts Teacher Member of the Texas A&M University System
Fort Bend Independent School District Hall of Honor
Sugar Land, Texas William H. Parker Leadership Academy
Visiting Lecturer (2005)
Oxford Round Table
University of Oxford, Oxford, England
Distinguished Alumnus (2004)
College of Education and Professional Studies
Central Washington University




ABSTRACT


This article underscores the importance of the teacher being an advocate and encourager for disengaged students, and particularly, for those students who are reluctant readers and writers.



Introduction

Some days the teacher feels defeated. She has spent hours preparing lessons, higher Bloom level activities, and disaggregating the dreaded pre-assessment and post-assessment data, and, the students react as if it is all inconsequential. She vents at the end of the day “that these students just don’t care.” But, a moment a quiet reflection in the hours of early dawn, bring the revelation that the students are listening. Many are hesitant to take risks and immerse themselves in the lessons because of the stain of not meeting the standards.




Introduction

The influence of the “teacher in the trenches” cannot be overlooked. She is on the front line trying to bring what often appear to be unreasonable and nonsensical requirements from the powers to be into fruition. The teacher must be a positive energy source and a subject matter expert to motivate these technologically advanced students to read critically and impart skills to enable the students to write to any situation or prompt given.

How to Speak Success
The students are listening and the students are watching you. The teacher’s demeanor, voice inflection, and enthusiasm are closely observed every minute of the day. The students follow your cues. The teacher must be on, every minute of the day she is in the building. They see you roll your eyes at the AP, wince as you look at their open-ended response, and wonder in amazement why tenth grade students cannot write a compound-complex tenth grade sentence, but would rather write in Dr. Seuss rhymes.
The author has learned, in trial-by-fire, observation, and reflection, that she sets the tone and standard for success. Greeting the students at the door has more purpose than just checking for dress code violations or whether they have their literature text book. Students need for you to acknowledge their prescense individually. Little things like asking them how their day is going, how was the game, or did you like that story, all speaks to their uniqueness and gives them a few seconds of undivided adulation from you.

What is Really Important Here?
Merely meeting assessment objective standard’s, is not all too successful learning in the English Language Arts classroom. The student must recognize a connection between herself and whatever literary text is being studied. She must be able to recognize a universal human experience. The student must understand the purpose for a writing assignment, how it relates to the enhancement of the reading selection and how it is connected to the curriculum. But, more importantly, how will this benefit me in the world.
The students need to know that their effort, however miniscule at times, is valued and appreciated, that their voice counts. There must be knowledge imparted and lessons eagerly received for learning’s sake, not just an assessment. Now, that is truly academic success! You, Dear Teacher, must be their guide, speaking success into those students who eyes cloud over with defeat, or will I make it in line fast enough to get two slices of pepperoni pizza. Encourage them for the smallest efforts. Let the students know that you are there for their success. They matter. One day Julius Caesar will be a fond memory, instead of some instrument of psychological torture.

Every Child Can Learn
As sarcastic as it sounds, every child truly can learn. Every student can learn and every student wants to recognized for their milestones. Admonish infractions quickly, but praise accomplishments just as fast. Be receptive to their hesitations. Students will tell you much about themselves, and about you, in their writings. They open their hearts and lives and lives in their journals. Acknowledge their experiences, because the experiences are part of what makes the individual student unique and receptive to learning.

Dear Student
Your teacher is glad to have you in the classroom today. Her wish is that you, in all of your adolescent rebellion and wonder, would work to your highest ability. Timed essays may not be your niche, but you have something important to say, and all the powers to be are listening. You are the force of the future. Give your best, and the world will stand in awe. I believe in you!

Concluding Remarks

In conclusion, the teacher’s demeanor and enthusiasm has a powerful effect on the academic success of her charges. You can speak success into their lives, or condemn them to counting the days till graduation with your energy. Encourage the young scholars with your words and deeds. Let the students know that you see each one of them, and that they matter. This is the fertile ground that true learning grows in.

Anonymous said...

The Lamar University Electronic Journal of Student Research
Spring 2009

Jumping In Feet First: Recommendations to a Successful Midyear Transition into Teaching in the
Secondary Classroom


Misti M. Morgan
PhD Student in Educational Leadership
The Whitlowe R. Green College of Education
Prairie View A & M University
Associate Principal
Spring Independent School District
Houston, Texas

William Allan Kritsonis, PhD
Professor and Faculty Mentor
PhD Program in Educational Leadership
Prairie View A&M University
Member of the Texas A&M University System
Hall of Honor
William H. Parker Leadership Academy
Visiting Lecturer
Oxford Round Table
University of Oxford, Oxford, England
Distinguished Alumnus
Central Washington University
College of Educational and Professional Studies

_____________________________________________________________________________
ABSTRACT
A challenge of secondary public school campuses continues to be the identification of highly-qualified teachers to achieve full-faculty staffing by the first day of school. In many cases, campuses maintain a list of vacancies well after the first instructional day, and once these vacancies are filled, more challenges usually await. Resistant students, new roles and responsibilities, and a constant sense of playing “catch up” can overwhelm a new teacher, and often lead to their departure at the end of their first, brief school year. Campus administrators can stem the tide of teacher attrition by appointing a campus induction coordinator or lead mentor to acclimate the midyear new teacher to the campus through observation, planning, and support, in turn allowing new teachers time to gain their footing before taking the first critical step towards student achievement.
______________________________________________________________________________
Introduction
A constant threat to the success of secondary schools is teacher staffing. It is no longer a guarantee that when the school doors open on the first day, there will be a teacher for every classroom. Teacher shortages, particularly in the content areas of math, science, and foreign language, plague administrators charged with hiring, and disadvantage students who in some cases already possess crucial gaps in their academic preparedness. Moreover, when a suitable teacher is identified after the start of school, the real challenges are only beginning. Students are oftentimes resistant to the new teacher, thinking that he or she is just another substitute unworthy of their respect or attentiveness. Without critical administrative and collegial support, a midyear new teacher can become easily disillusioned and frustrated, possibly to the breaking point. In many cases, this year’s late additions to teacher staff can become next year’s vacancies – again. Fortunately, such problems can be thwarted or mitigated by developing a sound preparation for midyear teacher induction that includes support, orientation, planning, and finally immersion that will not abandon the new teacher or shortchange the students. There is one caveat to the success of this idea: if schools are committed to the success of new teachers, then their campus expenditures should reflect that. A full-time induction coordinator or campus lead mentor must be hired and trained to lead the initiative of new teacher mentoring and training, or any attempts to retain quality instructors will most likely fail.
Purpose of the Article
The purpose of the article is to make recommendations for activities that will aid midyear new teachers in making a smooth transition into the secondary classroom. A critical component to their success will be the campus induction coordinator or lead mentor, who will be responsible for the midyear new teacher’s introductory activities and their successful completion.

Meet and Greet
Once a teacher has been selected and hired, their first day on the job should not be their first day in the classroom. Instead, new teachers should spend their first day getting to know the key players in their new environment. New teachers should spend time meeting their department chair, campus administration, and their colleagues before they ever deliver their first lesson. While time may be short, this critical step should not be omitted, as new teachers need to know their support systems.
Look and Learn
In many instances, teachers acquired after the start of school are either recent college graduates with no teaching experience or professionals from another employment field who are new to teaching as well. Neither employee will arrive to the job with a valid concept of how a structured classroom should look or operate. The second activity for a midyear new teacher should be to observe the classes of their colleagues. New teachers should observe their peers to gain perspective on classroom procedures, student management techniques, curriculum delivery, implementation, and instructional methods. These observations should be guided by an induction coordinator or mentor so that structured, quality debriefing can occur after each observation.

Turnover-Takeover
Another activity critical to new teacher success is time allotted for meeting with the outgoing substitute teacher. This meeting should center on the academic progress of the students, such as what they have learned thus far, their current place in the curriculum, and any information specific to their academic or social needs. Again, this process should be guided by the campus induction specialist or lead mentor to ensure a positive transference of information.

Phase-In and Phase-Out
As the midyear new teacher begins the final steps of the transition in full time teaching, it is critical that all support systems remain in place. After meeting key personnel in the school, observing their peers, and gathering information from the outgoing substitute teacher, it is time for the new teacher to begin instructing the students. A critical part of the midyear new teacher’s needs is to retain the substitute in the classroom for their first days on the job. Ideally, the substitute teacher can provide a stabilizing presence in the classroom as the new teacher finds their footing. Gradually, as the new teacher assumes the role of instructional facilitator, the substitute teacher will phase out of the classroom to allow the new teacher to take ownership of their surroundings. Throughout the transition, the campus induction coordinator or lead mentor maintains a constant presence to offer the new teacher support and guidance as they begin their new career.
Concluding Remarks
In conclusion, the critical steps of orientation, observation, and transitional planning cannot be omitted when welcoming new teachers after the start of school. These steps are more easily followed by campuses who commit to the acquisition of a full time induction specialist or lead mentor who possesses the time, knowledge, and enthusiasm to shepherd new teachers into the profession and help them achieve the ultimate goals of longevity, effectiveness, and success.

References
• Article is based upon the Spring ISD Westfield High School Induction Support Program for Educator Retention (WHISPER) plan for New Teacher Employee Orientation (no copyright).

Anonymous said...

Helping Student's Cope with the Impact of Sexual Harassment

Mary Ann Springs
William Allan Kritsonis, PhD
Hall of Honor
William H. Parker Leadership Academy
PVAMU
Texas A&M University System



ABSTRACT

It is the goal, if not the mission, of every school to provide a safe and friendly environment that will be conducive to student growth and development. Since the passing of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act if 1964, victims of sexual harassment can now be heard and safeguards are in place for their protection. Title IX was added to sexual harassment law as a means of providing protection under the law for students who were violated by another student, employee, or third party of a school district. Since schools are recipients of federal funds and are responsible for ensuring that sexual harassment regulations are enforced, what can school officials do to help students cope with the aftermath of sexual harassment? The article is designed to define sexual harassment, describe its impact, and provide strategies for the victim.
______________________________________________________________________


Introduction

Title IX, under the law prohibiting sexual harassment, was created to protect students against discrimination based upon gender and sexual misconduct by other students or school employees. Since the passing of the law, an influx of teacher harassment violations against students has become more prevalent in schools across the nation. Some students who are victims of sexual harassment may fail to seek help in coping with the trauma, and therefore, may undergo severe psychological issues or worse, seek to eradicate the pain through acts of suicide.


Purpose of the Article

Since sexual harassment has the potential to paralyze students to the point that the environment becomes hostile, it is the charge of school administrators and officials to intervene. Consequently, rather than report the incident or seek help, a victim of sexual harassment may allow the perpetrator to remain unchallenged and find themselves carrying the emotional and physical baggage of the infraction. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to address the nature of sexual harassment and to provide students who are victims with helpful advice on how to cope and move-on with their lives.

What Constitutes Sexual Harassment?

Sexual harassment is defined as unwanted advances of a sexual nature. Examples would include, but not limited to: unwanted physical contact, abusive sexual language, displaying e-mail messages or pictures of a sexual context, consistent demeaning or belittling others through words and actions based upon their gender. Under Title IX of sexual harassment regulations, sexual harassment also includes discrimination based upon gender or sexual orientation. This component of the law protects the rights of gay and lesbian students who are discriminated by means of bullying, which is also on the rise in public schools.
The second component of the law addresses the evaluation of a “hostile” environment caused by sexual harassment. An environment is deemed “hostile” when students are not allowed to engage in school programs based upon gender, sexual orientation, or when actions of a sexual nature are committed against them. These forms of discrimination place students in stressful situations and severely impact their class or work performance. A hostile environment can not only impact the victim, but it can also affect third parties who witness the incident as well.

How Students Become Victims of Sexual Harassment
Anyone can become a victim of sexual harassment. The most common form of sexual harassment is “quid pro quo”, in other words, something in exchange for something. In this event, a teacher may give a student a passing grade in a particular subject if the student provides sexual favors in return. Students may black-mail or threaten to expose another student if they don't give in to their sexual wishes or advances.
Sexual harassers can seduce their victims through many venues. For instance, the teacher may consistently “stalk” the student and look for an opportunity to catch the student alone. Some educators may use the “mother-figure” approach while secretly attempting to seduce the student. The most common approach is when the teacher supposedly acts as a mentor to the student but gradually lures the student into an uncompromising situation.



What School Officials Can Do to Prevent Sexual Harassment
School officials can help prevent sexual harassment of students through timely investigation of any incidents that may occur. The following suggestions can be used:
• School officials should take the student's complaint seriously. If the complaint is valid, parents should be contacted as soon as possible in order to prevent miscommunication and litigation issues.
• School administrators should also make sure the student verbalized that the act was un-welcomed to the perpetrator and report the action the student took in reporting the incident.
• Human Resources should complete an extensive background check on teachers and other personnel through normal procedures, as well as, talking with neighbors in the candidate’s community in order to gather additional data while under consideration for hiring. Furthermore, school officials should also investigate by questioning other personnel and students concerning teachers charged with sexual harassment.
• Once a student has filed a complaint, the school must ensure the student that the information shared will be kept as confidential as possible. Breaching student confidentiality could add embarrassment, humiliation, and fear to an already sensitive issue.
• Once an investigation has begun, the school should take immediate action to temporarily remove the suspect from his or her job assignment until the case has been solved. This removal will decrease the potential of the student being harmed by the suspect again.
• In the event that a teacher is found guilty of sexual harassment against a student, the school should provide medical assistance or psychological therapy for students since such infractions have been known to cause depression, fear, anxiety, lack of trust toward adults, and sometimes, suicidal acts.
• Additional interventions could be to link the student with a support group of individuals who were also victims of sexual harassment but have overcome and are now leading normal lives. The school counselor would be a great resource as well. Students would have easier access to services while saving the district out-of-school professional therapy costs.

Concluding Remarks
In summation, sexual harassment of students is an increasing and persistent problem that continues to plague the nation’s schools. As schools strive to implement mechanisms to ensure the goal of safe and respectful campus climates, keeping students free of sexual misconduct by it’s employees is equally important. Since public schools are beneficiaries of federal funds, they are charged with the responsibility of protecting the rights of all students under the law. If schools fail to do so, then this growing statement about educational stewardship is true…”Students don’t fail schools; schools fail students”.

Anonymous said...

William Allan Kritsonis, PhD
Editor-in-Chief
NATIONAL FORUM JOURNALS
Founded 1983
Over 5,000 Professors Published
www.nationalforum.com

NATIONAL FORUM JOURNALS
Partial Listing of Affiliated Universities, Colleges, and Schools

A.E. Phillips Laboratory School, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA
Albuquerque Public Schools, Albuquerque, NM
Alabama A&M University, Normal, AL
Anchorage School District, Anchorage, AK
American Association of University Professors, Washington, DC
Appalachian State University, Boone, NC
Atlanta Public Schools, Atlanta, GA
Azusa Pacific University, Azusa, CA
Ball State University, Muncie, IN
Baltimore County Public Schools, Baltimore, MD
Barry University, Miami Shores, FL
Ben Gurion University-Negev, Birmingham, AL
Biblioteksjanst Subscriptions, Lund, Sweden
Birmingham City Schools, Birmingham, AL
Blackwell’s Information Services, Oxford, England
Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA
Boston School District, Boston, MA
Boston SPA, Wetherby, Great Britain
Bowie State University, Bowie, MD
Bradley University, Peoria, IL
Brandon University, Brandon, Manitoba, Canada
Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
Brooks Administrative Center, Prince Frederic, MD
Broward Community College, Fort Lauderdale, FL
Buffalo City School District, Buffalo, NY
Buffalo State College, Buffalo, NY
Caddo Parish School Board, Shreveport, LA
California State University, Dominguez Hills, CA
California State University, Fresno, CA
California State University, Fullerton, CA
California State University, Los Angeles, CA
California State University, San Marcos
Canisius College, Buffalo, NY
Carson Newman College, Jefferson, City, TN
Central Missouri State University, Warrensburg, MO
Central Washington University, Ellensburg, Washington
Chestnut Hill College, Philadelphia, PA
Chicago Public Schools, Chicago, IL
City University, Bellevue, WA
Clark County School District, Las Vegas, NV
Clemson University, Clemson, SC
College of Modern Languages, Kaohsiung, Taiwan
Columbia University, New York, NY
Columbus City School District, Columbus, OH
Dallas Independent School District, Dallas, TX
Dawson U.K., LTD, Kent, England
Dayton Public Schools, Dayton, OH
Denver Publish Schools, Denver, CO
Detroit Public Schools, Detroit, MI
District of Columbia Public Schools, Washington, DC
Devine Information Services, Westwood, MA
Drake University, Des Moines, IA
East Baton Rouge Parish School Board, Baton Rouge, LA
East Carolina University, Greenville, NC
Eastern Washington University, Cheney, WA
EBSCO Industries, Birmingham, AL
Emporia State University, Emporia, KS
ERIC Clearinghouses
FAXON, Westwood, MA
Fayetteville State University, Fayetteville, NC
Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL
Florida Gulf Coast University, Fort Myers, FL
Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL
Forth Worth Independent School District, Fort Worth, TX
Fresno Unified School District, Fresno, CA
Furman University, Greenville, SC
George Washington University, Washington DC
Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA
Goodlett Elementary School, Memphis, TN
Gulf Coast State University, Ft. Myers, FL
Harrassowitz, Wiesbaden, Germany
Harvard University, Cambridge, MA
Hawaii Department of Education, Honolulu, HI
Henderson State University, Arkadelphia, AR
Houston Independent School District, Houston, TX
Illinois State University, Normal, IL
Iowa State University, Ames, IA
International Resource & Development Center, Richmond, VA
John Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD
Karger AG, Schweiz, Switzerland
Kean University, Union, NJ
Long Beach Unified School District, Long Beach, CA
Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge
Los Angeles County Office of Education, Los Angeles, CA
Los Angeles Unified School District, Los Angeles, CA
Loyola University, Chicago, IL
Loyola University, New Orleans, LA
Marshall University, South Charles, WV
Miami-Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL
Memphis City School District, Memphis, TN
Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI
Midwest Library Services, Bridgeton, MO
Milwaukee Public Schools, Milwaukee, WI
Minneapolis Public Schools, Minneapolis, MN
Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS
Mobile County Public School System, Mobile, AL
Morris MacDonald School, Manitoba, Canada
New Orleans Public Schools, New Orleans, LA
New York City Department of Education, New York, NY
Niagara University, Niagara Falls, New York
Nicholls State University, Thibodaux, LA
North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC
North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND
North Mississippi Regional Center, Oxford, MS
Ohio University, Athens, OH
Oklahoma City Public Schools, Oklahoma City, OK
Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
Oakland Unified School District, Oakland, CA
Omaha Public Schools, Pittsburgh, PA
Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR
Oriel College, University of Oxford, Oxford, England
Portland State University, Portland, OR
Portland School District, Portland, OR
Postfach, Schweiz, Switzerland
Prairie View A&M University, Prairie View, TX
Providence College, Providence, RI
Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
Readmore Academic Services, Inc., Turnersville, NJ
Rhode Island College, Providence, RI
Richmond City School District, Richmond, VA
Roosevelt University, Chicago, IL
Rowan University, Glassboro, NJ
San Antonio Independent School District, San Antonio, TX
San Diego State University, San Diego, CA
San Diego City Unified School District, San Diego, CA
San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA
San Francisco United School District, San Francisco, CA
Seattle Pacific University, Seattle, WA
Seattle Public Schools, Seattle, WA
Seattle University, Seattle, WA
SKANFO
South Carolina State College, Orangeburg, SC
Southeastern Louisiana University, Hammond, LA
Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL
Southern University, Baton Rouge, LA
Southwest Missouri State University, Springfield, MO
Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA
Sul Ross State University/Rio Grande College, Del Rio, TX
Sul Ross State University/Rio Grande College, Eagle Pass, TX
Sul Ross State University/Rio Grande College, Uvalde, TX
SUNY, New York, NY
Sweets Blackwell, Inc., The Netherlands
Sweets Blackwell, Inc., Runnemeda, NJ
Sweets Blackwell, Inc., Exton, PA
Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York
Tennessee State University, Nashville, TN
Texas A&M University, College Station, TX
The Truman Pierce Institute, Auburn University, Auburn, AL
The University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada
Toledo-Lucas County Public Library, Toledo, OH
Troy University, Troy, AL
Tufts University, Boston, MA
Tucson Unified School District, Tucson, AZ
University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL
University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR
University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH
University of Colorado at Denver, Denver, CO
University of Dayton, Dayton, OH
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
University of Georgia, Athens, GA
University of Idaho, Moscow, ID
University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI
University of Houston, Houston, TX
University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA
University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan
University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, LA
University of Louisiana at Monroe, Monroe, LA
University of Louisville, Louisville, KY
University of Lowell, Lowell, MA
University of Maine, Orono, ME
University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA
University of Memphis, Memphis, TN
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN
University of Mississippi, Oxford, MS
University of Missouri, Columbia, MO
University of Missouri at St. Louis, St. Louis, MO
University of Montana, Missoula, MT
University of Nebraska at Lincoln
University of Nebraska at Omaha
University of Nevada at Las Vegas, Nevada
University of Nevada at Reno, NV
University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC
University of North Carolina at Wilmington, Wilmington, NC
University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND
University of North Florida, Jacksonville, FL
University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO
University of Notre Dame, South Bend, IN
University of Oregon, Eugene, OR
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
University of San Diego, San Diego, CA
University of San Francisco, San Francisco, CA
University of Scranton, Scranton, PA
University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL
University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC
University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD
University of Southern Maine, Gorham, ME
University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS
University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN
University of Texas, Arlington, TX
University of Texas, Austin, TX
University of Texas of the Permian Basin, Odessa, TX
University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
University of the Virgin Islands, St. Thomas, VI
University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA
University of Washington, Seattle, WA
University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY
Valdosta State University, Valdosta, GA
Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
Washington State University, Pullman, WA
Wayne State University, Detroit, MI
Weber State University, Ogden, UT
Western Illinois University, Macomb, IL
West Texas A&M University, Canyon, TX
West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV
Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, NC
Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY
Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA
Wichita School District, Wichita, KS
Winona State University, Winona, MN
Winston-Salem State University, Winston-Salem, NC
Xavier University, New Orleans, LA
York University, Ontario, Canada
Youngstown State University, Youngstown, OH

William Allan Kritsonis, PhD said...

The Lamar University Electronic Journal of Student Research
Spring 2009

Jumping In Feet First: Recommendations to a Successful Midyear Transition into Teaching in the
Secondary Classroom


Misti M. Morgan
PhD Student in Educational Leadership
The Whitlowe R. Green College of Education
Prairie View A & M University
Associate Principal
Spring Independent School District
Houston, Texas

William Allan Kritsonis, PhD
Professor and Faculty Mentor
PhD Program in Educational Leadership
Prairie View A&M University
Member of the Texas A&M University System
Hall of Honor
William H. Parker Leadership Academy
Visiting Lecturer
Oxford Round Table
University of Oxford, Oxford, England
Distinguished Alumnus
Central Washington University
College of Educational and Professional Studies

_____________________________________________________________________________
ABSTRACT
A challenge of secondary public school campuses continues to be the identification of highly-qualified teachers to achieve full-faculty staffing by the first day of school. In many cases, campuses maintain a list of vacancies well after the first instructional day, and once these vacancies are filled, more challenges usually await. Resistant students, new roles and responsibilities, and a constant sense of playing “catch up” can overwhelm a new teacher, and often lead to their departure at the end of their first, brief school year. Campus administrators can stem the tide of teacher attrition by appointing a campus induction coordinator or lead mentor to acclimate the midyear new teacher to the campus through observation, planning, and support, in turn allowing new teachers time to gain their footing before taking the first critical step towards student achievement.
______________________________________________________________________________
Introduction
A constant threat to the success of secondary schools is teacher staffing. It is no longer a guarantee that when the school doors open on the first day, there will be a teacher for every classroom. Teacher shortages, particularly in the content areas of math, science, and foreign language, plague administrators charged with hiring, and disadvantage students who in some cases already possess crucial gaps in their academic preparedness. Moreover, when a suitable teacher is identified after the start of school, the real challenges are only beginning. Students are oftentimes resistant to the new teacher, thinking that he or she is just another substitute unworthy of their respect or attentiveness. Without critical administrative and collegial support, a midyear new teacher can become easily disillusioned and frustrated, possibly to the breaking point. In many cases, this year’s late additions to teacher staff can become next year’s vacancies – again. Fortunately, such problems can be thwarted or mitigated by developing a sound preparation for midyear teacher induction that includes support, orientation, planning, and finally immersion that will not abandon the new teacher or shortchange the students. There is one caveat to the success of this idea: if schools are committed to the success of new teachers, then their campus expenditures should reflect that. A full-time induction coordinator or campus lead mentor must be hired and trained to lead the initiative of new teacher mentoring and training, or any attempts to retain quality instructors will most likely fail.
Purpose of the Article
The purpose of the article is to make recommendations for activities that will aid midyear new teachers in making a smooth transition into the secondary classroom. A critical component to their success will be the campus induction coordinator or lead mentor, who will be responsible for the midyear new teacher’s introductory activities and their successful completion.

Meet and Greet
Once a teacher has been selected and hired, their first day on the job should not be their first day in the classroom. Instead, new teachers should spend their first day getting to know the key players in their new environment. New teachers should spend time meeting their department chair, campus administration, and their colleagues before they ever deliver their first lesson. While time may be short, this critical step should not be omitted, as new teachers need to know their support systems.
Look and Learn
In many instances, teachers acquired after the start of school are either recent college graduates with no teaching experience or professionals from another employment field who are new to teaching as well. Neither employee will arrive to the job with a valid concept of how a structured classroom should look or operate. The second activity for a midyear new teacher should be to observe the classes of their colleagues. New teachers should observe their peers to gain perspective on classroom procedures, student management techniques, curriculum delivery, implementation, and instructional methods. These observations should be guided by an induction coordinator or mentor so that structured, quality debriefing can occur after each observation.

Turnover-Takeover
Another activity critical to new teacher success is time allotted for meeting with the outgoing substitute teacher. This meeting should center on the academic progress of the students, such as what they have learned thus far, their current place in the curriculum, and any information specific to their academic or social needs. Again, this process should be guided by the campus induction specialist or lead mentor to ensure a positive transference of information.

Phase-In and Phase-Out
As the midyear new teacher begins the final steps of the transition in full time teaching, it is critical that all support systems remain in place. After meeting key personnel in the school, observing their peers, and gathering information from the outgoing substitute teacher, it is time for the new teacher to begin instructing the students. A critical part of the midyear new teacher’s needs is to retain the substitute in the classroom for their first days on the job. Ideally, the substitute teacher can provide a stabilizing presence in the classroom as the new teacher finds their footing. Gradually, as the new teacher assumes the role of instructional facilitator, the substitute teacher will phase out of the classroom to allow the new teacher to take ownership of their surroundings. Throughout the transition, the campus induction coordinator or lead mentor maintains a constant presence to offer the new teacher support and guidance as they begin their new career.
Concluding Remarks
In conclusion, the critical steps of orientation, observation, and transitional planning cannot be omitted when welcoming new teachers after the start of school. These steps are more easily followed by campuses who commit to the acquisition of a full time induction specialist or lead mentor who possesses the time, knowledge, and enthusiasm to shepherd new teachers into the profession and help them achieve the ultimate goals of longevity, effectiveness, and success.

References
• Article is based upon the Spring ISD Westfield High School Induction Support Program for Educator Retention (WHISPER) plan for New Teacher Employee Orientation (no copyright).

Jackline said...

Hi Nice Blog .This employee time attendance is used to track the time and attendance of employees, and at the same time track labor activity against specific parts, jobs, and operations.

William Allan Kritsonis, PhD said...

Committees Sometimes Error

William Allan Kritsonis
PhD Program in Educational Leadership
The Whitlowe R. Green College of Education
Prairie View A&M University
Member of the Texas A&M University System


As a young assistant professor at a major institution of higher education, I was given a report on the status of my productivity by the department committee assigned to provide junior professors periodic assessment of their performance. I had just completed my second year of a three year contract. I had published twenty articles in refereed journals, two books, and over forty articles in non-refereed periodicals.
The committee reported that my teaching was satisfactory as was my community service, and I was also satisfactory in my publishing in refereed journals at the national level. However, the committee noted that I lacked foresight in establishing a refereed journal in educational administration and supervision.
Since 1983, that journal and companion journals that I founded, have published the scholarly contributions of over 3,000 professors in higher education. The journal the committee said I lacked foresight in establishing is titled the NATIONAL FORUM OF EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION JOURNAL—now considered by many as the United States’ leading recognized scholarly academic refereed journal in educational administration and supervision.
As founder of the NATIONAL FORUM JOURNALS, we now publish a group of highly respected academic professional hard copy periodicals along with our division of electronic journals. More than 250,000 guests visit our website yearly at: www. nationalforum.com.
Finally, the point is, the committee changed the rules in evaluating my productivity and far exceeded the scope of its purview. I had satisfactorily met the requirements in teaching, service and scholarship/publishing. To say that I lacked foresight in establishing a refereed journal was both wrong and raised questions about professional jealousy on the part of the committee members. One would expect affirmation for his entrepreneurial effort in establishing a professional refereed journal.
Since 1983, I have published over 250 separate issues of refereed journals, published over 200 articles, written five books, and received numerous academic honors and awards. I am glad that I did not accept the committee’s assessment of my professional productivity as a young assistant professor. I am currently a Professor of Educational Leadership in the Texas A&M System at Prairie View A&M University. I teach in the newly established PhD Program in Educational Leadership. I was honored to teach the inaugural class session in the new doctoral program at the start of the fall semester of the 2004-2005 academic year.